I Believe

I believe that
 
…orthodox Christianity is, in effect, churchianity and is thus a departure from the faith taught in the Bible.  The solution is not to reform church but rather to abandon it and pursue Jesus Christ instead.
 
…everyone goes to heaven.  No one is excluded from the ultimate redemption of God – all human beings go to heaven, believing and unbelieving alike.
 
…we should all repent because all of us are being judged by God and will be judged by God.  Morality matters.  The Bible calls it righteousness.  Pursuing it for Jesus’ sake should be our prevailing waking thought.  It is the purpose for which we were put here.
 
…no one has to go to church.  God doesn’t sanction church; He doesn’t care about churchgoing.  Jesus came that each human being might relate directly to God, all day long, without human intermediary.
 
…Jesus Christ has already come again.  That happened late in the 1st Century A.D.  When He came, He came as God – that’s why no one physically saw Him.
 
…there is only one God.  There is no Trinity.  That concept was devised as church theologians tried to reconcile Jesus’ divinity with the fact that He had not yet returned.  Had they realized that His return was in His divine nature, they would not have had to construct such a strange concept.  They also would not have perpetuated church; instead they would have sought the kingdom of God.
 
…I believe the resurrected Jesus Christ is God of all of us, and that religious labels like Christian and Muslim, or even nonreligious labels like atheist and agnostic, have no meaning to Him.
 
Explanation of these and related ideas can be found at this page
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11 Responses to I Believe

  1. Anonymous says:

    You lack biblical support for any of these arguments.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Mark 9:43?
    Jesus thought it was pretty serious.

    • Mike says:

      In this verse Jesus is speaking about judgment. That’s why we should repent! See the post Judgment Is Upon Us as well as this overview which covers the following 15 subjects:

      •Call on His Name
      •Whose Approval Do You Want?
      •Why the Bible Can Be Trusted
      •It’s a Salvation of the Soul…Not Circumstances
      •Do You Love What Is Right?
      •The Resurrection of Jesus Christ Changed Everything
      •Seeking the Kingdom of God Instead of Church
      •The Kingdom of God Is Here and Now
      •Church Is Not the Answer
      •All Bible Prophecy Has Been Fulfilled
      •Judgment Is Upon Us
      •Practicing the Presence of God
      •Walking in the Spirit and Not in the Flesh
      •Jesus Christ Has Already Come Again
      •Everyone Is Going to Heaven

  3. David E says:

    …everyone goes to heaven.

    I salute you for rejecting the inhumane doctrine of Hell.

    But, if you are correct, why did Jesus tell the parable about a man in hell begging for water? It is surely rather strongly misleading if no such place exists. My mother’s suffering when I deconverted from Christianity, for example, would have been vastly diminished had the doctrine of universal salvation been made clear in the Bible (seems rather an important issue to fail to state plainly and unambiguously). I’d have certainly appreciated that.

    • Mike says:

      There are some things in the Bible hard to understand, but I hope you will read The Biblical Case for Everyone Going to Heaven which will give you a thorough biblical understanding of the issue. It will also explain why the heaven-or-hell scenario, while traditionally taught in Christian churches, is not consistent with the Bible. I cannot explain why the heaven-or-hell mentality prevails in so many Christian minds except to say that church leaders are generally more concerned with growing their churches than they are with living according to the Bible.

      By the way, if you read The Biblical Case for Everyone Going to Heaven you will find the parable you mention discussed in the last chapter. I’m sorry for the pain your mother endured.

      • David E says:

        I’m familiar with the biblical arguments for universalism (and annihilationism and hell). Although I wish you were right that universalism is what the bible teaches, it’s abundantly clear that one must cherry-pick the bible (and with one’s eyes half closed) to make one’s case—and even then it’s pretty thin. Regardless, being neither a Christian nor a theist, I have little concern for what the Bible teaches other than when my fellow citizens try to impose their beliefs about Biblical morality on the rest of the country by force of law.

        • Mike says:

          Based on what you’ve said, I don’t think you are familiar with the biblical argument I make for everyone going to heaven. Therefore, I hope you will read The Biblical Case for Everyone Going to Heaven. It does not cherry-pick verses, but rather addresses what the Bible teaches over and over on this issue. I learned these things by reading the Bible, not by listening to those who espouse universalism.

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