Inerrancy Is Not the Point; The Point Is Christ

The debates about biblical inerrancy are seldom edifying.  This is because the focus of such debates is usually away from Jesus Christ.  And it’s often about “the jots and tittles” of the Bible – an exercise in majoring on minors.  Or, as Jesus would put it, “Straining out gnats and swallowing camels.”

That’s why in my review of Thom Stark’s book about inerrancy I made it clear that I was arguing for Christ and not for the Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy (CSBI).  Indeed, one of the reasons I took up the review of Thom’s book when I don’t normally get involved in the inerrancy argument is that his book took errancy to some extreme conclusions, including the assertion that “Jesus was wrong.”  I also stayed focused on Christ in my conversation with Joel Watts about Thom’s book.

Inerrancy is not the answer; rather, Christ is the answer.  Of course, believing Christ is errant is going back to no answer.  For how can He who claimed to be the truth tell a lie?

Therefore, don’t devote your energy to standing up for inerrancy, especially when its definition is numbered in pages (Noah Webster would never have gotten his project off the ground if words required as much explanation as the CSBI gives this one).  Rather devote yourself to standing up for Jesus Christ and Him crucified – the Savior of the world.

Jesus Christ Is God

Why the Bible Can Be Trusted

This entry was posted in General. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Inerrancy Is Not the Point; The Point Is Christ

  1. rey says:

    A Jew could as easily say “Inerrancy is not the point; the point is Torah!” Once you admit the Bible is not inerrant, you have to admit along with it that you do not have a monopoly on God or heaven, and since Christians don’t want to give up their perceived monopoly, there will be never-ending fights over inerrancy. Jews, on the other hand, actually tend to not believe in inerrancy, and along with this non-belief in inerrancy comes the belief that moral Gentiles will be saved without having to convert to Judaism. Christianity tends to say that unless you believe in Jesus as God you will burn forever–and therefore, it has a lot to lose (namely its mean attitude) if it gives up inerrancy. And if we can’t be mean to everyone, what’s the point in even being religious?

  2. Mike Gantt says:

    Whether one is a Christian, a Jew, an atheist, or something else doesn’t matter.  Everyone is going to heaven.  Nonetheless, morality does indeed matter to God and, in fact, His judgments are upon us now for our sins in ways we seldom seem to recognize.  That is, just because everyone is going to heaven doesn’t mean that morality doesn’t matter.  It matters a lot!  In fact, the whole point of being a human being is to be as moral (the Bible would say “righteous”) as we can.

    Being mean is immoral, and therefore frowned upon by God.  We should all repent and turn to Jesus.  Do not turn to church, do not turn to Christians.  Do not be religious. Do turn to Jesus, and let Him make you more moral.

  3. Pingback: The Problem with Inerrancy | Current Events in Light of the Kingdom of God

Comments are closed.