Category Archives: Genre

“Jesus of Testimony” – New Documentary Testifies to the Historicity of Jesus Christ

First below, I’ve posted the trailer (3:34) for this new documentary, and then the documentary (2:14:34) itself. Jesus Of Testimony Trailer from Nesch Bros on Vimeo. Jesus Of Testimony from Nesch Bros on Vimeo. With Easter approaching, this is the … Continue reading

Posted in Attestation & Corroboration, Biblical Scholars, Dating Texts & Events, Early Christianity (30-100 A.D.), Genre, Greco-Roman Culture, Literacy & Orality, Messianic focus, Movies & TV, Other Biblical-Era Literature, Resurrection of Christ, Textual Issues | 1 Comment

How Do Eastern And Western Religions Differ? – Win Corduan on The One-Minute Apologist

What distinguishes Judaism and Christianity on the one hand from, say, Buddhism and Hinduism on the other?  It is the formers’ reliance on history and the latters’ detachment from it. Thus those Christians who want to say that it doesn’t … Continue reading

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Five proofs that the Old Testament is not mythology by Joel Furches

This is an excellent and substantive article, which begins: While far from universally accepted, even the most strident critic must admit that the Christian New Testament has a great deal of historical relevance. It is correlated in numerous areas by … Continue reading

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“The Bible Among Myths” by John Oswalt Shows the Bible Is Not Myth

This book review is by G. Kyle Essary of the Apologetics 315 web site.   While John Walton and others have argued that Genesis was a reaction to ANE myths, Oswalt makes clear that Genesis was much more than that. … Continue reading

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Peter J. Williams Lectures on the Historical Reliability of the Gospel Narratives

Peter J. Williams lectures on the historical reliability of the gospel narratives | Wintery Knight. I have previously linked to this lecture by Peter Williams.  Nevertheless I’m posting this link to Wintery Knight as well because it adds a link … Continue reading

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Psalms Where God Is Called the King

These are psalms wherein God or the Lord is referred to as King.  An example would be “You are my King, O God” (Psalm 44:4) or “The Lord is King forever and ever” (Psalm 10:16).  In addition to the psalm … Continue reading

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Herman Gunkel’s List of Royal Psalms

This list matches the list of royal psalms provided in The Jewish Study Bible, except that the latter source includes Psalm 89.  Psalms 61 (see verse 6) and 63 (see verse 11) mention a king but are not considered “royal … Continue reading

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A List of Royal Psalms

The Jewish Study Bible, in its notes on Psalm 2, defines “royal psalms” as “those concerning kings.”  It goes on to say that “None [of them] mentions a specific king by name, and their origin and uses remain obscure.”  It also … Continue reading

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Revelation: An Introduction with Ian Paul

At about the 3:00 mark, the speaker is talking about genre generally and apocalyptic specifically. He points out that Mark 13:24-27 is apocalyptic language – a way of speaking that Jesus’ contemporaries would have recognized. It is a good way … Continue reading

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“Paul’s letters were literary substitutes for his apostolic presence”

“Paul’s letters [were] literary substitutes for his apostolic presence…” – Carey Newman   This is taken from his entry to the anthology Israel’s God and Rebecca’s Children: Christology and Community in Early Judaism and Christianity (Baylord University Press, page 155).

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