When the Son Began Speaking, the Father Went Silent

Among the last utterances we have from the Father in the Scriptures is “This is My beloved Son in whom I’m well pleased; listen to Him” (Matthew 17:5; Mark 9:7; Luke 9:35).  That marked the time that the Son began speaking with the Father keeping relative silence.  It’s been that way ever since.

Trinitarians act like it’s the Father who is still speaking and the Son  who has gone silent, but it’s the other way around according to the Scriptures.  Haven’t the Trinitarians noticed that the Father “retired” when He handed all things over to the Son (Matthew 11:27).

So, since the Son began speaking, the Father went silent (Hebrews 1:1-2).  Wonder why?

It’s because God spoke as the Father when He was the Father, and has been speaking as the Son since He became the Son.  And now the Son is the Father once again (Isaiah 9:6-7).  (When God sent His Son to die for the sins of the world, He was sending Himself.)

For more on this subject, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

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There Is Only One Lord

It should go without saying that there is only one Lord.  Nonetheless, the trinity doctrine tries to challenge this idea by saying that there are two or three Lords.  First, trinitarians will acknowledge that Jesus is Lord (which is wonderful if they would stop there), but they go on to say that “Lord” also refers to “the Triune God” (in which Jesus represents the second of three persons).  Sometimes trinitarians additionally say that God the Father is Lord, too.  Thus to embrace the trinity doctrine is to embrace two or three Lords, and therefore, be confused about precisely whom we should be seeking to obey.

By contrast, the Bible is clear that there is only one Lord.  Both the Old Testament and New Testament explicitly and emphatically make this point (Deuteronomy 6:4; 1 Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4;5).  God the Father was that Lord until He made Jesus Lord (Acts 2:34-36).  Jesus will never cease being Lord (Isaiah 9:7; Daniel 7:14; Ephesians 1:20-21).

Who was God the Father?  He was who Jesus was before He became Jesus.

For more on this subject, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

Does the Son of God Not Grow Up?

The Bible’s doctrine of Christ is that Messiah (i.e. Christ) experiences sufferings, followed by glories (Luke 24:26; 1 Peter 1:10-12).  Of course, there is much more to the doctrine than that – but this represents the outline.  The last of the sufferings was His crucifixion and then death.  The first of the glories was to be raised from the dead.  The next was to be taken up into heaven and seated at the right hand of God.  His final glory was to be enthroned above a new heavens and new earth.

To experience all the glories, Jesus – the Son of God – would need to grow up.  That is, He would need to grow up as God just as He had grown up as a human being.  He began human life as a baby in the womb of a female descendant of David who was betrothed to a male descendant of David.  Jesus of Nazareth matured into a full-grown adult in His early thirties before He was killed.  He was born again as the Son of God on the day of His resurrection from the dead (Acts 13:33; Psalm 2:7; Romans 1:4). He grew up as the Son of God over the ensuing 30 years or so until the time came for His Second Coming at which time He was “fully grown” as God and thereupon took His rightful place as head of all things in the new creation (Ephesians 1:10; Colossians 1:18) – the event we so often refer to as the Second Coming.

The Trinity doctrine would stunt Jesus’ growth and keep Him from His destiny as God over all, while the Bible says that Jesus would come in the glory of His Father (Matthew 16:27), that all the glory of His Father’s house would be hung on Him (Isaiah 22:24), and that this Son of God would be called “Mighty God” as well as “Eternal Father” (Isaiah 9:6).

See how the trinity doctrine wants to stifle the growth of the Son of God?  Turn instead to the doctrine of Christ, which the Bible teaches, and serve the King of Kings: Jesus Christ our Lord.  He who has seen Him has seen the Father.

For more on this subject, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

Is Jesus Our Brother or Our Father?

Jesus is our brother by virtue of His humanity, and He is our Father by virtue of His deity.

To paraphrase, Jesus became our brother in the days of His flesh – that is, from the time He was conceived in Mary’s womb by the Holy Spirit through His suffering and death.  He was tempted in all points as we are, yet without sin (Hebrews 4:15).  He became our Father in the days of His resurrection to, and glorification in, heaven.  We were begotten from His seed (1 Peter 1:23), and we are thus His children and He is our heavenly Father.

For this reason Isaiah prophesied that the “Son” would be called “Father” (Isaiah 9:6), and that there would be no end to this arrangement (Isaiah 9:6-7).  Thus we may rightly say that Jesus was our brother but is our Father (2 Corinthians 5:16) in the same way that He was David’s son but is David’s Lord (Matthew 22:41-46; Acts 2:34-36).

One of the problems with the Trinity doctrine is that it tries to keep Jesus as our brother and won’t let Him be our Father.

For more on this subject, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

Jesus Is the Father of Spirits

Hebrews 12:9 speaks of Jesus as “the Father of spirits.”  This is, of course, because Jesus is the “Lord” who was spoken of in the preceding verses 5 and 6 who exhorts His “sons,” and because He is the one upon whom we were exhorted to “fix our eyes” in verses 1 and 2.  It is also because of what the prophets said about Messiah.

Though Isaiah prophesied that the Messiah would die childless (Isaiah 53:8), he also prophesied that Messiah would eventually have an abundance of children (Isaiah 54:1-3).  Isaiah also prophesied that Jesus would be “a Mighty Father” (Isaiah 9:6).  And besides, how could it ever be that the obedient seed of Abraham would ever remain childless anyway?  (Genesis 17:4-5)

From where did Jesus receive these children?  Isaiah says He inherited them from His Father (Isaiah 8:17-18; Hebrews 2:13).  (See also The Father Died and Left All to the Son and The Transfer from Father to Son…Who Became Father.)

During His earthly ministry, Jesus had explained that a birth from above was necessary (John 3:3-8).  Only by being born from above would heaven ever become humanity’s ultimate home (Everyone Is Going to Heaven).  For this reason Jesus was raised from the dead and ascended into heaven, that we might be born from above (1 Peter 1:3).  For this reason also we cry out to Him “Father!”  He is the Father of our spirits.  And whatever is spirit is eternal (2 Corinthians 4:18).

Apart from Jesus we have no place or inheritance in heaven.  With Him we are joint heirs of all things (Romans 8:17).  No wonder we call Him “our Father.”  All things come Him.

For more, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

The Father Died and Left All to the Son

God, whom the New Testament calls “the Father,” died and left everything that was His as an inheritance to His Son, Jesus Christ.  For this reason, the New Testament says that the Son was to be heir of all things (Hebrews 1:1-2).

This transference of property was documented in the Scriptures, particularly the Old Testament, which can be considered the last will and testament of the Father.  The Son of God, according to the stipulations of the will, received as sole heir all that had been the Father’s.  The Son thus became Father to all creation, according to Isaiah 9:6.

Of course, when the Father “died” He became the Son, for even with humans death is not an end but a transition.  There is only one God.

For more, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

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The Transfer from Father to Son…Who Became Father

Jesus said “all things have been handed over to Me by My Father” (Matthew 11:27).  Indeed, the Father designated the Son as “heir of all things” (Hebrews 1:1-2).

The reason that all things were being transferred from the Father to the Son was that the Father was becoming the Son (Matthew 1:23).  God was a quarterback who could throw a football so far that only He could run fast enough to catch it.  Thus, He gave up His life as God and became a man.  Through His resurrection from the dead He returned to heavenly status and eventually to His role of God and Father (Isaiah 9:6).  This occurred at what is called the Second Coming of Christ.

Thus, all things were transferred from the Father to the Son…and then the Son became the Father – the role which had belonged to Him from the beginning.

For more, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

Jesus Was Not Called “Father” in the New Testament Because It Was Not Yet Time

There is a time for everything (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8).  God does everything in due time.  For this reason we should not grow weary in well doing for in due time we shall reap if we do not grow weary (Galatians 6:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:13).

The process of Messiah’s sufferings and glories (Luke 24:25-27; 1 Peter 1:10-11) was a due process with each of the sufferings and each of the glories coming in its own due time.  Because of this, it would have been premature and confusing to routinely address Jesus as “Father” prior to His final exaltation at the coming of the kingdom of God (which occurred shortly after the New Testament documents were written) just as it would have been premature to proclaim Him as Messiah prior to the completion of His sufferings (Matthew 16:20-21).

But that Jesus would ultimately be called “Father” is as sure as the Old Testament prophecies such as Isaiah 9:6 and 22:21-24.

For more, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ